Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 2)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 2)

National Dog Day is just a few days away, and I’m celebrating this canine holiday by sharing a few lessons that my dog, Rudy, has taught me over the years. Rudy is my 11.5 year old English Springer Spaniel. I got him when he was only one month old.

Last session, I shared about what Rudy has taught me about significance. Today, I’m sharing the second lesson that I’ve learned from Rudy.

 

 

Session Recap

  • It’s a common myth that gentleness equals weakness or passivity. But that’s just not true.
  • People who have gentleness are secure in their identity and comfortable in their own skin.
  • Leaders who are gentle are extremely aware of the people they are talking to and their surroundings. They know just how much “force” is needed for each person and situation.

 

Game Plan

Think about these two questions. Make some notes in a journal or notebook, and review your answers often to be sure you’re practicing gentleness.

  • Which situations or people make it hard for you to practice gentleness?
  • Why is that?

 

Question

Can a leader be strong and gentle at the same time? Tell us what you think by leaving a comment on this post, or submitting your thoughts on our Questions page.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Resources

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 1)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 1)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 1)

 

Did you know National Dog Day is just one week away? What better way to celebrate this holiday than to introduce you to my dog, Rudy. Rudy is an 11.5 year old English Springer Spaniel. I got him when he was only one month old.

We have spent many years together. I’ve tried my best to train him. But if I’m honest, he has probably taught me more than I have taught him.

In honor of this canine holiday, I’m going to share with you a few lessons that Rudy has taught me. 

 

 

Session Recap

  • We let our circumstances affect our attitude way too much. There is nothing wrong with showing emotion, but if we don’t keep our emotions in check they can hurt our influence and leadership.
  • How do we keep our emotions in check? Two ways:
    • Be consistent. Your emotions should be in a consistent range and people should know how you are going to react to certain situations.
    • Have a positive energy. Bring energy and life to the people and environments that you interact with instead of stealing their energy with your negativity.

 

Game Plan

Answer these questions honestly:

  • Which “emotional check” do you struggle with more, consistency or positive energy?
  • What will you do to be more proactive in how you react to situations?

 

Question

What leadership or life lessons have you learned from your pets? Leave your most memorable lesson in the comments (or share with us on social media)!

 

Tweetable Lesson

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 3)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 3)

 

We are currently in a series about the most inappropriate word I use on a regular basis. By now, you may know that word is busy. If you’re just joining us, I’m including links back to the first two sessions in the Resources section below.

Today, I’m sharing about the final danger in the word “busy.” 

 

 

Session Recap

  • Busy makes you think you’re in control. But busy is really in control. It becomes your master. How?
    • Busy is never satisfied. Enough is never enough.
    • Busy cares more about activity than priority. Busy hurts my leadership and influence by sacrificing what matters most…people and relationships.
  • Activity does not lead to significance and influence.
  • If you try to accomplish everything, you’ll end up accomplishing nothing.

 

Game Plan

Today, the game plan is to set up a comparison. Here’s how:

  • First, think about your highest priorities. 
  • Next, record your schedule for two weeks.

After two weeks is up, compare your schedule with your list of priorities. How do they line up? Do they match, or do you need to make some changes so they are in alignment?

 

Question

How do you think being busy hurts our leadership and influence? Share your thoughts in the comments, and let’s encourage each other to think through this a little deeper.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Resources

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 1)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 2)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 2)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 2)

 

Last session, I confessed the most inappropriate word I use on a regular basis, and we talked about the first danger it poses. The word? Busy. 

Today, I’m sharing the second danger of the word busy. If you missed the last session, you can find a link to it in the Resources section below.

 

 

Session Recap

  • Busy is deceptive. Our Western culture has taught us that busyness equals importance. But that’s a lie.
  • Significance comes from quality, not quantity. It’s about adding value to people and your community.
  • Busy doesn’t lead to significance, it leads to despair.
  • Fight busy by realizing that less is more.

 

Game Plan

Today, reflect on these questions:

  • Are you significant? Use a 1-10 scale (10 being high, 1 being low).
  • What makes you significant?
  • Reflect on your answers to the previous two questions. Are you gaining significance by what you do or who you are?

 

Question

Do you think being busy leads to significance or importance? Why or why not? Share your thoughts in the comment section, and let’s continue the conversation.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Resources

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 1)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 1)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 1)

 

Today, we’re starting a series talking about the most inappropriate word I use on a regular basis. At first, I didn’t realize how bad this word really was. In fact, I thought it was actually innocent.

However, wrapped up in this four-letter word was deception, arrogance, passivity, and ultimately slavery. I couldn’t believe how naïve I was to the danger and the effects that this word had on not only my life, but also on the lives of the people around me.

You may think I am overreacting, but over our next few sessions I’m going to show you the danger in this word…

 

 

Session Recap

  • The word “busy” is overused. It doesn’t mean anything when we use it as a response to “How are you doing?”
  • These days, most everyone is “busy.” As a leader, you risk losing influence when you say “I”m busy.” (Stay tuned for more on this in the next leadership training session!)

 

Game Plan

Today, try this:

When someone asks you, “How are you doing?” instead of saying “Busy,” try being real with them. I’m not saying you need to pour out your life to them. But what if you shared some of the things that you are either grateful for or some of the things that you are excited about in your life?

What you may find is that although this may not be a long conversation, when you are being more authentic and real, your conversations will be more meaningful. 

 

Question

What do you think of the word busy? Share your thoughts in the comment section, and let’s get the conversation started!

 

Tweetable Lesson

The Essentials for Every Effective Speech (Part 2)

The Essentials for Every Effective Speech (Part 2)

Over the last few sessions, we have been discussing practical techniques to help you become a better public speaker. In the previous leadership training session, we started a series on the “essentials” that every speech and communication needs in order to be effective.

The first essential is passion and today I’m going to share the second essential.

 

 

Session Recap

Leaders communicate with integrity. What does this mean? A few examples:

  • Tell stories. In fact, tell great stories. But make sure they’re not exaggerated. Leaders cannot afford to tell exaggerated, untrue stories.
  • Always give credit where credit is due. People will respect you for citing references, giving credit, and not plagiarizing.
  • Fact check your communication beforehand. Since not everything you read is true, it’s important to take time to double-check and cross-check stories, stats, and other illustrations you’re using. It’s worth the time.

 

Game Plan

Here are a couple questions to ask yourself:

  • Based on the session today, how would you rate yourself on speaking or communicating with integrity?
  • Think through some of your favorite stories that you like to tell. Do they pass the integrity test? If not, then they may be fine to share with some friends to get a good laugh but you might want to refrain when sharing them in the public arena.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Resources

The Essentials for Every Effective Speech (Part 1)