Maximizing Your Potential

Maximizing Your Potential

What separates leaders who maximize their potential from those who have a lot of promise but never fulfill it? It’s three words: strengths, weaknesses, and blindspots. We all have them, but the leaders who truly live significant lives have learned to utilize their strengths, weaknesses, and blindspots for maximum influence and effectiveness. They do this by refining their strengths, compensating for their weaknesses, and minimizing their blindspots.

In order to help you maximize your potential, I’ve compiled a four-part video leadership training series that will help you do just that: refine your strengths, compensate for your weaknesses, and minimize your blindspots. Just click on the links below to start maximizing your potential.

What Most People Don’t Realize About Their Strengths

Your Weaknesses Can Be a Powerful Leadership Tool

The Single Greatest Predictor of Maturity

A Final Word on Strengths and Weaknesses

Question

What are you doing to refine your strengths, compensate for your weaknesses, and minimize your blindspots? Share in the comments section below, or join the conversation on social media.

The Socially Acceptable Addiction

The Socially Acceptable Addiction

Most addictions like alcohol and drug abuse are frowned upon and fortunately, there are many ways to seek help and treatment. But those are not the addictions I’m talking about today.

Within the last 25 years or so, there has been an addiction that has grown exponentially, plaguing millions of Americans. And even though this addiction will eventually kill one’s leadership, influence, relationships, and career, as a society we actually are enablers and reward it.

So what is this socially acceptable addiction?

 

 

Session Recap

  • Working too much leads to burnout. Working 50, 60, and 70 hours each week has become the norm.
  • How do you battle this addiction? Take time off.
  • Taking time off does two things:
    • Increases productivity
    • Increases your energy and mood
  • Getting enough sleep is one way to recharge. But also try to find hobbies or activities that energize and replenish you. 
  • Good leaders prioritize this practice. Not only will you benefit, but so will your family, and those you lead.

 

Game Plan

Alright, it’s time to get practical. Think about activities that you can do daily, weekly, monthly, and even yearly to recharge your batteries. Break it down even further, it makes it easier. Let yourself dream a little. Make yourself three lists (I’ve given you an idea to get started):

  • What is one thing you can do in the evenings? (Mine: go on a date with my wife, or read a book.)
  • What is one thing you want to do this weekend to have fun? (I’d choose a day at the park.)
  • Monthly and yearly (Top of my list: a trip to a zoo, and an annual getaway with my family.)

 

Question

What are your thoughts on working too much? Are the dangers exaggerated or is this a real problem for our society? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 3)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 3)

Today is National Dog Day, and I’m celebrating this canine holiday by sharing three leadership lessons I’ve learned from my dog, Rudy, over the years. Rudy is my 11.5 year old English Springer Spaniel. I got him when he was only one month old.

In the last two sessions, I shared about what Rudy has taught me about significance and strength. I’ve linked those sessions in the Resources section below. Today, I’m sharing the third lesson that I’ve learned from Rudy, about the antidote to one of the greatest leadership killers.

 

 

Session Recap

  • One of the greatest leadership killers is bitterness.
    • The antidote is forgiveness. We must learn to forgive unconditionally.
  • Don’t harbor bitterness. Holding grudges or having pent up bitterness is a cancer to our soul, relationships, and leadership.
  • A good leader recognizes that we don’t have to dwell on what happened. We can process it, learn from it, and then move on.

 

 

Game Plan

Today’s Game Plan calls for some reflection. Think through this: who in your life have you not forgiven? A good test is what emotions or words come to your mind when you think of that person. If it is negative, then you haven’t forgiven them.

You need to forgive them in your heart first and then you might even need to talk to them about how they have wronged you. And seek restoration.

 

Question

Can you be considered a great leader and be easily offended? Why or why not? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Resources

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 1)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 2)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 2)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 2)

National Dog Day is just a few days away, and I’m celebrating this canine holiday by sharing a few lessons that my dog, Rudy, has taught me over the years. Rudy is my 11.5 year old English Springer Spaniel. I got him when he was only one month old.

Last session, I shared about what Rudy has taught me about significance. Today, I’m sharing the second lesson that I’ve learned from Rudy.

 

 

Session Recap

  • It’s a common myth that gentleness equals weakness or passivity. But that’s just not true.
  • People who have gentleness are secure in their identity and comfortable in their own skin.
  • Leaders who are gentle are extremely aware of the people they are talking to and their surroundings. They know just how much “force” is needed for each person and situation.

 

Game Plan

Think about these two questions. Make some notes in a journal or notebook, and review your answers often to be sure you’re practicing gentleness.

  • Which situations or people make it hard for you to practice gentleness?
  • Why is that?

 

Question

Can a leader be strong and gentle at the same time? Tell us what you think by leaving a comment on this post, or submitting your thoughts on our Questions page.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Resources

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 1)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 1)

Lessons From My Dog, Rudy (Part 1)

 

Did you know National Dog Day is just one week away? What better way to celebrate this holiday than to introduce you to my dog, Rudy. Rudy is an 11.5 year old English Springer Spaniel. I got him when he was only one month old.

We have spent many years together. I’ve tried my best to train him. But if I’m honest, he has probably taught me more than I have taught him.

In honor of this canine holiday, I’m going to share with you a few lessons that Rudy has taught me. 

 

 

Session Recap

  • We let our circumstances affect our attitude way too much. There is nothing wrong with showing emotion, but if we don’t keep our emotions in check they can hurt our influence and leadership.
  • How do we keep our emotions in check? Two ways:
    • Be consistent. Your emotions should be in a consistent range and people should know how you are going to react to certain situations.
    • Have a positive energy. Bring energy and life to the people and environments that you interact with instead of stealing their energy with your negativity.

 

Game Plan

Answer these questions honestly:

  • Which “emotional check” do you struggle with more, consistency or positive energy?
  • What will you do to be more proactive in how you react to situations?

 

Question

What leadership or life lessons have you learned from your pets? Leave your most memorable lesson in the comments (or share with us on social media)!

 

Tweetable Lesson

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 3)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 3)

 

We are currently in a series about the most inappropriate word I use on a regular basis. By now, you may know that word is busy. If you’re just joining us, I’m including links back to the first two sessions in the Resources section below.

Today, I’m sharing about the final danger in the word “busy.” 

 

 

Session Recap

  • Busy makes you think you’re in control. But busy is really in control. It becomes your master. How?
    • Busy is never satisfied. Enough is never enough.
    • Busy cares more about activity than priority. Busy hurts my leadership and influence by sacrificing what matters most…people and relationships.
  • Activity does not lead to significance and influence.
  • If you try to accomplish everything, you’ll end up accomplishing nothing.

 

Game Plan

Today, the game plan is to set up a comparison. Here’s how:

  • First, think about your highest priorities. 
  • Next, record your schedule for two weeks.

After two weeks is up, compare your schedule with your list of priorities. How do they line up? Do they match, or do you need to make some changes so they are in alignment?

 

Question

How do you think being busy hurts our leadership and influence? Share your thoughts in the comments, and let’s encourage each other to think through this a little deeper.

 

Tweetable Lesson

 

Resources

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 1)

The Most Inappropriate Word I Use on a Regular Basis (Part 2)